Sharon fruit

Sharon

Synonym:
Sharon fruit
Plural:
Sharons, Sharon fruits
Family:
Ebenaceae – Ebony Family
Species:
Diospyros kaki

Origin

Sharon fruits are named after the coastal plain of Israel. For their origin and spread see kaki.

Plant

Sharon fruits are an Israeli advanced breeding of the kaki, they are “low-maintenance” variation: They grow easily to harvest in low shrubs, contain neither tannin nor seeds and can be eaten whole with the skin on.

Cultivation

Today, Sharon are cultivated everywhere except in Israel and Colombia, Brazil and Spain.

Importations

They are imported from October to March from the cultivation countries. The fruits taste best in November.

Fruit

Edible:
The whole fruit with skin.
Odour:
Neutral.
Flavour:
A mixture of quince and peach.
Size and shape:
They are shaped like a kaki; they have a basic of wide peduncle with robust dark green sepals.
Skin:
Carroty; lightly shining; flat and thin like a tomato.
Flesh:
It is divided into segments. It is seedless, coloured yellow-orange and tastes sweet and crispy.
Ripeness:
The fruits are about as soft as a ripe, but very steady tomato and taste sweet and crisp, but not especially juicy.
Overripe fruits:
They become jelly-like and, in the end, mushy.
Unripe fruits:
Firm.

Usage

They may be eaten raw as well as put in sweet salads. They can be mashed for creams or drinks and stewed for compote.

Storage

Ripe fruits with a sliceable consistency can be put in the fridge for 1 or 2 days. Post-maturation: room temperature.