Durian

Durian

Plural:
Durians
Family:
Bombacaceae – Floss Silk Tree family
Species:
Durio zibethinus

Origin

The trees come from west Malaysia and Borneo.

Plant

The trees with a slender bole and a widely cantilevered crown grow to around 30 m high and carry yellowish-white blossoms, which smell of sour milk. The whole fruit consists of 5 fruit crevices of which contain 2 to 3 seeds in each case. Ripe Durians immediately fall from the tree and are highly desired — among people, elephants, monkeys and civet cats.

Cultivation

In Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore and on the Philippines.

Imports

Regularly, largely from Thailand.

Fruit

Edible:
Seminal coat and seeds.
Inedible:
The bowl and pulp — the seeds are embedded within the seminal coat.
Odour:
If you like Durian, it will be perceived as delicious. If not, it will be seen as a mixture of cheese, turpentine and rotten eggs.
Flavour:
It is a mixture of garlic, onions, almonds and vanilla, which appears aromatic to those who like it, to others it is unsavoury.
Size:
Up to 30 cm long, 12 to 25 cm in diameter.
Weight:
Up to 10 kg; fruits of 3 to 4 kg are sold.
Shape:
Like a hedgehog.
Bowl:
It is green-brown to olive-green, closely taken with pyramid shaped spikes.
Seminal coat:
It is cream-coloured; soft and, nevertheless, firm; sweet and viscous like honey.
Seeds:
They can be as large as chestnuts with a taste reminiscent of walnuts.
Ripeness:
The characteristic scent and flavour must be present.
Overripe fruits:
The seminal coat becomes rancid, acidic and discoloured brownish.
Unripe fruits:
if it is not with us.

Usage

It can be consumed raw as a fruit, mixed with vanilla ice-cream, pudding or rice while the seeds may be roasted in oil.

Storage

Basically, ripe fruits should be used quickly because of their striking odour; halved durians are left in the shell, folded up and tied. They should be kept for maximum 1 day; opened fruit begins to ferment.