Curuba

Curuba

Plural:
Curubas
Family:
Passiflorae – Passion flower family
Species:
Passiflora molissima

Origin

Like all passion fruits, the Curuba comes from Central and South America. From archaeological findings, it is believed that the passion fruit is an ancient plant that was cultivated by the indigenous South Americans.

Plant

It is a climber like the liana and decorates pergolas and bowers. It grows outside, but for us, it only prospers as an indoor or conservatory plant. It carries leaves similar to wine foliage and long pink or wine-red blossoms. The longish fruits, which hang like bobbins on stems develop from it.

Cultivation

Aloft in the chilly situations of the Andes.

Importations

All the year round from Colombia and Peru.

Fruit

Edible:
Flesh and seeds.
Inedible:
The skin.
Odour and flavour:
It is mild, spicy, sour, somewhat reminiscent of apples, oranges and cucumbers.
Size and Shape:
The grow up to 10 cm long and about 3 cm thick.
Bowl:
Delicately haired and velvety; white-yellow or brick-red, possibly as thick and firm as a banana.
Flesh:
yellow to orange, jelly-like with many edible and aromatic seeds.
Ripeness:
When the skin is steadily yellow or red and is starting to shrink.
Overripe fruits:
They are unpleasantly sour.
Unripe fruits:
The skin is greenish

Usage

It may be spooned out and eaten raw or used in creams, fruit sauces and drinks.

Storage

Whole ripe fruits may be stored for about 1 week in a cold area, but must not be put in the fridge. At post-maturation, they should be stord at room temperature.