Clementine

Clementine

Plural:
Clementines
Family:
Rutaceae – Citrus Family
Species:
Citrus reticulata × Citrus aurantium

Origin

Acknowledging the year of origin of this fruit is almost as controversial as trying to find out whether it was a coincidence of nature, or from the intentions of breeders that resulted in the mixing of the sweet mandarin and the sour bitter orange. They say that the Catholic priest Clément Rodier bred the clementines in around 1890 or that he found them in his garden in the beginning of the 20th Century. The third version of this story: the clementine was coincidentally discovered in the year 1912. It is safe to say that it originated in Algeria and was named after the French Trappist monk Père Clément.

Plant

There are very thorny, evergreen bushes or trees that produce mandarins and their numerous varieties. Clementines grow on closely foliated, medium-large trees, which yield higher than usual.

Cultivation

In terms of cultivation and popularity, worldwide clementines are the vanguard of all relatives of the mandarin. The best quality fruit comes from the coastal region of West Morocco.

Importations

From October to January; Predominantly supplier country is Spain, in addition Morocco, Algeria, Italy, Israel and Turkey.

Fruit

Edible:
The flesh.
Inedible:
The treated peel.
Odour and flavour:
It is typical of citrus fruit, sweet and pleasantly acidic.
Noteworthiness:
They are predominantly seedless.
Size and shape:
Much like a mandarin.
Bowl:
darkly orange to reddish.
Flesh:
It is orange-red and very aromatic.
Ripeness:
They are easy to peel; the flesh is harmoniously sweet and sour.
Overripe fruits:
The flesh is droughty.
Unripe fruits:
The skin is greenish, the flesh is adherent with sour fruit.

Usage

May be consumed raw or in sweet dishes and salads.

Storage

Mature fruits should be stored at room temperature. Like all other citrus fruit, clementines will not continue to ripen after harvesting.